Preparedness for flooding and hurricane impact

Our thoughts are with all the people displaced by tropical storm Barry and affected by the severe weather along the East Coast. Feel free to reach out for support and answers to your questions. Your local museums and institutions may be overwhelmed by the requests of help or may be focused on preparing in case the emergency materializes. Wherever you are, you can reach us through the numbers and emails listed on our Facebook page. We are glad and eager to help.

You can also contact the National Heritage Responders (NHR). Volunteers provide advice and referrals by phone at (202)661-8068 or, for less urgent questions, emergencies@culturalheritage.org. For more information:
https://www.culturalheritage.org/resources/emergencies/national-heritage-responders

If you have an emergency plan, review it with everyone involved. Make sure the phone numbers in your list are current. If you have art pieces or storage close to the ground and are afraid your space may become flooded, move your collection to increase its distance from the floor. For example, if you have large paintings hanging from the walls and close to the floor, consider placing them flat on tables.

These are some “tip sheets” prepared by the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) for response and recovery in case of emergency for the arts. The topics covered range from Mold to Removing flat paper pieces from flat storage and Drying wet collections and buildings.
https://www.culturalheritage.org/resources/emergencies/national-heritage-responders/tip-sheets

More useful information on stabilization of photographs, textiles and family heirlooms:
https://www.culturalheritage.org/resources/emergencies/disaster-response-recovery

A list of activities from the American Institute for Conservation (AIC)s’ website for emergency preparedness:

  • If you have a disaster plan, dust it off and make sure it’s up to date.
  • If you don’t have a plan, commit to creating one by making a timeline for developing it.
  • Conduct a building evacuation drill, evaluate the results, and discuss ways to improve your staff’s performance.
  • Update your staff contact information and create a wallet-size version of your emergency contact roster using the Pocket Response Plan™ (PReP™)
  • Identify the three biggest risks to your collection or building (such as a dust storm, leaking water pipe, heavy snow, or power failure) and outline steps to mitigate them. You can use FAIC’s tools for risk evaluation to guide your assessment.
  • Identify and prioritize important collection materials.
  • Eliminate hazards such as storage in hallways, blocked fire exits, or improper storage of paints, solvents, etc.
  • Make a plan to install any needed safety systems.
  • Plan to train and drill an in-house disaster team.
  • Provide staff with easily accessible disaster response information, such as the Emergency Response and Salvage Wheel.
  • Get to know your local firefighters and police–invite them to come tour your institution and give you pointers on safety and preparedness.
  • Plan to take a course on risk assessment or disaster planning.

After Hurricane Sandy MoMA prepared and distributed a document with simple and concise instructions on how to stabilize affected artworks.  You can find it on MoMA’s website under “Immediate Response for Collections”:
https://www.moma.org/momaorg/shared/pdfs/docs/explore/conservation/emergency_guidelines_for_art_disasters.pdf

Friday, July 19th Houston Arts Alliance (HAA) and Fresh Arts Workshop in Houston

On Friday, July 19th the Houston Arts Alliance (HAA) and Fresh Arts will host an introductory workshop and a symposium on emergency preparedness for the arts.
TX-CERA instructors will conduct the workshop with a hands-on approach and will address participants’ questions.
The symposium will focus on developing and maintaining an emergency plan.

Workshop and symposium are part of a 2-day conference that covers a vast array of topics of interest for artists: from marketing and self-promotion, to legal resources and copyrights.  Registration is $150 and closes on Sunday, July 14.
Workshop and symposium are free and open to the public.

Resources Expo: Friday, July 19th, noon-2pm
Free and open to the public.
The expo will have several resources available to artists and creative entrepreneurs at tables. The Houston Arts Alliance (HAA) is sponsoring the expo and facilitating the following resources:
  • TX-CERA (Texas Cultural Emergency Response Alliance) teach artists how to recover their assets after a flood
  • Performing Arts Readiness will provide sample documents to help entrepreneurs develop a plan to endure their safety in case of emergencies large and small
  • HAA will provide Hurricane Preparedness Guides specific to artists and arts organizations, as well as the CERF+ Studio Safety Guide

Symposium: Friday, July 19th, 2pm-5pm
Free and open to the public; designed for those who have an emergency plan and want to expand on their preparedness knowledge.

Emergency Preparedness Consultant Ellen Korpar will speak about readiness of performing arts organizations for emergencies in Houston. Building upon this report, former fire chief and emergency management expert Gary Friedel will facilitate a tabletop recovery exercise which will group TX-CERA experts and additional attendees in cross-network groups to develop a response framework and strategy in a  real-world scenario.

For additional information about the conference:
https://www.fresharts.org/content/fresh-arts-summit

Conference Schedule-at-a-glance:
https://www.fresharts.org/content/summit-schedule-and-presenters

Location:
Silver Street Studios, 2000 Edwards Street, Houston, TX 77007
https://www.silverstreethouston.com/

 

For additional information about Fresh Arts:
https://www.fresharts.org/content/what-fresh-arts

For additional information on Houston Arts Alliance (HAA):
https://www.houstonartsalliance.com/

 

 

PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 8, 2019 Contact: Eryl Wentworth, Executive Director Phone: 202.661.8060 Email: ewentworth@culturalheritage.org Collecting Institutions: Prepare for Heavy Rainfall on Gulf Coast WASHINGTON, DC—A low pressure system over central Georgia is expected to move toward the Gulf of Mexico over the next few days. This system will likely produce heavy rainfall along parts of northern and eastern US Gulf Coast. Those in the storm’s path should prepare for the likelihood of an extreme water event later this week. The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) offers free emergency response assistance to cultural organizations impacted by the event. Please help ensure that staff members of collecting institutions are aware of these resources: • Information on disaster recovery and salvage for impacted collections can be found online at www.culturalheritage.org/resources/emergencies. • The National Heritage Responders, a team of trained volunteer conservators and collections care professionals, are available to provide advice on the phone via a free 24-hour hotline at 202.661.8068. • National Heritage Responders are also available to conduct pro bono on-site assessments and provide guidance on salvage. Call the hotline (202.661.8068) to request assistance. Collecting institutions are encouraged to do all that you can to stabilize your collections before the storm hits, while also making sure that your response contact lists and resources are ready to use, should your institution be affected. ### The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that delivers and supports an array of programs and initiatives to protect our shared cultural heritage. FAIC tells the story of conservation, empowers professionals working within the field, and shares instrumental knowledge and resources. FAIC works with organizations and individuals to ensu servation is widely understood, appreciated, and supported.

FAIC’s Emergency Response & Salvage Wheel

The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) offers a tool to guide responders to an emergency that affects our cultural heritage. In case of an emergency, the most important action is to stabilize the artifacts to avoid further damage until they could be properly treated by a conservator.

A very useful tool to guide the first responders is the FAIC’s Emergency Response & Salvage Wheel. The two-sided-wheel lists on one side the steps of the emergency response, on the other side the appropriate action to stabilize 9 types of artifacts.

The cost is $10 ($5 if you buy 10 or more).
https://store.culturalheritage.org/site/index.php?app=ecom&ns=prodshow&ref=FAIC-1

Emergency Response & Salvage Wheel from FAIC website

After stabilizing the artifacts, do not attempt treatment. It is very important that you contact an experienced conservator.
For a list of Professional Associates and Fellows of the American Institute for Conservation, please visit:
https://www.culturalheritage.org/membership/find-a-conservator

PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)

When disaster strikes, fortunately for our communities first responders and volunteers come to the rescue.
As we know from many tragic examples of great heroism and ultimate sacrifice, unfortunately first responders and volunteers are often not sufficiently protected and during an emergency put the safety of their community first, over their own health and safety.

Before responding to an emergency, think about Personal Protective Equipment that will protect you as you are generously helping your community.

The American Institute for Conservation (AIC) has created and maintains a Wiki page dedicated to PPE:
http://www.conservation-wiki.com/wiki/Personal_Protective_Equipment_(PPE)

In particular for protective gloves this page offers a table with the type of glove safe to use to handle different categories of chemicals:
http://www.conservation-wiki.com/wiki/PPE_Chemical_Protective_Material_Selection_Guide

Regarding tight fitting air-purifying respirators, necessary in case of volatile chemicals such as organic solvents, please be aware that you have to undergo a medical check up and an annual respirator fit test to ascertain that using the respirator will not tax your heart and respiratory system and that you are trained to wearing it correctly.
A Conservator’s Guide to Respiratory Protection by Craig E. Colton offers an exhaustive explanation:

http://www.conservation-wiki.com/w/images/c/c3/H%26S_A_Conservator%27s_Guide_to_Respiratory_Protection_2016.pdf

For the masks that filter particulate and dust, make sure to choose N-95 models that filter at least 95% of the particulate. The “duck bill” model is one of the most comfortable to wear.

Thank you for your volunteering!

Before pests become an emergency…

Two important websites to guide you in understanding how to prevent infestations or control and eliminate pests once they’ve unintentionally entered your collection.

  1. The MuseumPests Working Group was formed by collection managers, conservators, entomologists and other professionals for the implementation of integrated pest management in museums, libraries, archives, and other collection-holding institutions: https://museumpests.net/
    Main sections:

2.  What’s Eating Your Collection is a website by the Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery dedicated to integrated pest management with guidance to its implementation and to the identification of the insects that you may find with recommendations in case you need to take action.
http://www.whatseatingyourcollection.com/
(Note: this website requires Flash)

July 9 Free Webinar on HVAC

The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) is offering a series of webinars through its Connecting to Collection Care program.

On July 9, 2 – 3:30 pm (EDT) the topic will be temperature and humidity control through heating, ventilation and air conditioning.  If you are considering upgrading your system or would like to gain a better understanding of the parameters you can modify to optimize your existing system, follow the link for additional information and to register:

HVAC Installation, Renovation, and Collections Environments – An Introduction

Discussion will include an introduction to updates in the 2019 American Society for Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Handbook – Applications, Chapter 24: Museums, Galleries, Archives, and Libraries.

TX-CERA Training, Response and Workshops, Update

TX-CERA stands ready to serve in case of future disasters, not only in their home state, but in other areas of the nation in need of help. Indeed, as recovery work continued in Texas, a TX-CERA representative made two trips to Puerto Rico in October and December 2017, to assist art museums, artists, and libraries with storm mitigation following Hurricane Maria. Today, there are still some institutions engaging in the long recovery work from disaster. TX-CERA’s first responder efforts put many on the path to recovery.

In surveying the challenges and success of actions taken by TX-CERA during Hurricane Harvey recovery—and in recognition of additional challenges in the coming years for cultural heritage resources along the Gulf Coast—the FAIC and TX-CERA were prompted to approach the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for support to increase the number of museum and library professionals trained to respond safely and professionally to future local and regional disasters. On October 25, 2017, The Mellon Foundation awarded $100,000 to the FAIC to support emergency training for staff in collecting institutions from three key at-risk cities nationwide: Houston, Miami, and Seattle. In Texas, the grant supported a program to train and establish a state response team of thirty-five collections professionals in collaboration with TX-CERA. The cost-free training program used a curriculum similar to that used to train FAIC’s National Heritage Responders (NHR), and was conducted using both hands-on instruction and distance learning. The selection of participants were made on a competitive basis. This new team, Texas Heritage Responders (THR), formed of volunteers from across the state, will not only be a ready resource for response at the state level but will also be available to supplement the NHR team members elsewhere, if need be. The THR group is attached to the Texas Emergency Management Assistance Team (TEMAT). This is the forward response and recovery team for the Texas Department of Public Safety. The program serves as a state resource with multi-disciplined, multi-talented, and highly qualified members. A TEMAT member is a subject matter expert with a mastery of all phases of their area of expertise. TEMAT is deployed under the direction of the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM), as required to support local entities in the event of a catastrophic incident or event. The response teams are recruited from various disciplines at the local level, and coordinated with other state agencies. https://www.preparingtexas.org/Resources/documents/2017%20Conference/Texas%20Emergency%20Management%20Assitance%20Team%20(TEMAT).pdf

 

Additionally, TX-CERA is collaborating with the Houston Arts Alliance (HAA)—the city’s designated local arts and culture agency—in an effort to create and disseminate information through the Houston Area Arts and History Disaster Resilience Plan. Recognizing that the vast majority of artists, cultural practitioners, and arts and culture organizations are unprepared for the next sudden or historic disruption, the HAA secured funds to hire an experienced disaster planning professional and to create an advisory committee of cultural nonprofit leaders and artists, funders, and public-sector disaster professionals. In creating the plan, the working group sorted through the dozens of opportunities, needs, and questions that surfaced during the recovery period following Hurricane Harvey and assessed needs and paths forward to create disaster response elements, such as communication databases and vehicles; damages assessment systems; engagement with existing public and private disaster resources at the City of Houston, Harris County, and the region; ongoing training for nonprofits and individuals; and corps of expert disaster responders to help in recovery efforts. TX-CERA’s Steven Pine sits on the HAA’s advisory committee. TX-CERA also has been part of the planning process and agreed to be content experts during training workshops designed for artists and arts and history organizations. https://ready.haatx.com/

Through education and advocacy, TX-CERA strives to serve as a resource for cultural institutions in order to mitigate loss of cultural and heritage collections due to disaster. Hurricane Harvey and the resultant flooding in August 2017 was historic in nature. Key support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and its Chairman’s Emergency Grant program helped TX-CERA effectively respond to the crisis. Through their actions, TX-CERA was able to offer immediate help and advice to arts and cultural heritage organizations in need, and spread knowledge on mitigation and recovery efforts to both the community and their peers. The continued effort to create a master list of arts and cultural organizations in the Texas Gulf Coast region not only positively impacts hundreds of arts and heritage groups in the wake of Harvey, but also should be an invaluable tool to facilitate quicker response in case of future disasters. https://txcera.org/

Past posting of a successful Hurricane Harvey collaboration in Houston, 2017

Harvey_Arts_Recovery_Workshopx